Category Archives: Environment

Adkins Arboretum Offers Science Program for Homeschool Students

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
September 2, 2013

This fall, homeschool students will investigate native wildlife in a series of dynamic field experiences when Adkins Arboretum offers Science for Homeschoolers: Wild Investigations. Students will learn scientific skills to determine animals’ environmental lifestyles; design model birds in an exploration of flight adaptation; conduct habitat assessments; delve into herpetology; and identify fish anatomy after a visit to Tuckahoe State Park’s fish ladder.

This eight-week program for home school students ages 8 to 12 runs Mondays, Sept. 23 to Nov. 11, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The fee is $65 for members, $75 for non-members. A $10 discount is offered for siblings. Advance registration is required. Register at www.adkinsarboretum.org, or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Offers iNaturalist Training for Teachers

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
June 17, 2013

Teachers seeking inventive ways to engage students in the study of nature and ecology are invited to join iNaturalist for Teachers, offered Fri., June 28 at Adkins Arboretum.

iNaturalist is a free and open-source online community that teachers can use to reinforce Maryland State Department of Education STEM and environmental literacy standards. The perfect interface between nature and technology users, the program encourages users to observe and describe the natural world around them, to follow their curiosity, and to share their experiences with others. iNaturalist provides a public online forum where students’ field observations can be cross-checked by a community of fellow enthusiasts and global experts.

Led by naturalists Matt Muir and Margan Glover, this program is geared to high school science teachers. The session will provide hands-on examination of iNaturalist, field work on a variety of habitats to explore the strength of iNaturalist as a tool for exploration, and a discussion of ways in which iNaturalist can be incorporated creatively in curriculum development and meet STEM and environmental literacy standards. Refreshments will be served; participants should bring a bag lunch. The program fee is $20 per teacher. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Offers Soup ’n Walk Program on May 18, 2013

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
May 13, 2013

Tuckahoe Creek is a beautiful, tranquil spot that provides views of a wide variety of flowering plants. Join a walk to search for blooms along its banks when Adkins Arboretum hosts a popular Soup ’n Walk program on Sat., May 18. Following a guided walk, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided.

Participants may choose a one-hour or two-hour walk to catch glimpses of mountain laurel, beech and tulip trees, black cherry tree blossoms, pink lady’s slipper orchid and Solomon’s seal blooms, and May apple fruit. The menu includes vegetarian chili, roasted red beets over mesclun salad, apple date wheat bread with apple jelly, and blueberry marmalade crisp. The two-hour walk begins at 10 a.m.; the one-hour walk begins at 11 a.m.

The program is $20 per person for members, $25 per person for the general public. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0. To schedule Soup ’n Walk programs for groups of 15 or more, contact Ginna Tiernan, Adult Program Coordinator, at 410-634-2847, ext. 27 or gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org.

Photo: Adkins Arboretum docent Julianna Pax, at left, pauses on a bridge in the Arboretum forest so participants can search for spring blooms during a Soup ’n Walk program. This Saturday’s Soup ’n Walk will focus on Tuckahoe Creek.

Adkins Arboretum docent Julianna Pax, at left, pauses on a bridge in the Arboretum forest so participants can search for spring blooms during a Soup ’n Walk program. This Saturday’s Soup ’n Walk will focus on Tuckahoe Creek. Submitted Photo.

Celebrate National Public Gardens Day with Free Admission to Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
May 1, 2013)

Adkins Arboretum will celebrate the American Public Gardens Association’s (APGA) fifth annual National Public Gardens Day by waiving admission fees on Fri., May 10.

Slated to coincide with Mother’s Day weekend, the unofficial start of spring, National Public Gardens Day affords public gardens an opportunity to showcase their gardens and highlight the valuable contributions they make to their communities.

On National Public Gardens Day, Arboretum visitors can shop from the region’s largest selection of ornamental native plants at the Native Plant Nursery; view an exhibition by artists Katherine Kavanaugh and Jennifer Wallace; take a self-guided tour or an audio tour; explore the forest, wetland, meadows and gardens; and learn about the link between native plants, land conservation and a healthy Chesapeake Bay. Visitors who become members will receive a free one-year subscription to Better Homes and Gardens magazine, in addition to a host of other benefits.

Arboretum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Nursery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and weekends by appointment.

Founded in 1940, Delaware-based APGA is devoted to strengthening public gardens throughout North America. Its membership includes more than 500 public gardens in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Canada and seven other countries.

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Paradise Under Glass Author Ruth Kassinger to Speak May 4, 2013 at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
April 23, 2013

Chronicle one gardener’s journey from brown thumb to green when author Ruth Kassinger presents Paradise Under Glass on Sat., May 4 at Adkins Arboretum.

Ruth Kassinger - Submitted Photo

Ruth Kassinger – Submitted Photo

Like many baby boomers in middle age, Kassinger was at an emotional crossroads. Confronted by numerous challenges, she was searching for a way forward. One cold, gray evening, flooded with thoughts of change and loss, she wandered into the U.S. Botanic Garden’s conservatory—and a dream was born. Dazzled by the vast and dense tangle of greenery, she began a quest to create a verdant sanctuary of her own at her home in suburban Washington, D.C.

In this lecture, Kassinger will take participants step by step, from the construction of her conservatory through her efforts to identify the easiest to grow, most beautiful houseplants. In chronicling her journey to create her own tropical refuge, she also provides a lively narrative tour of the glasshouses of the past, including Renaissance orangeries, the whimsical follies of Georgian England, the legendary Crystal Palace, and selected Victorian ferneries. Throughout, she shares the knowledge and insights that creating and sustaining her garden has bestowed, lessons of loss and letting go, nurturing and rebirth, challenge and change, love and serenity. Paradise Under Glass is the remarkable story of the fruition of a dream that is sure to inspire.

Kassinger’s 90-minute talk begins at 1 p.m. The program fee is $15 for members, $20 for the general public. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

One Hundred Footsteps, collaborative art by Jennifer Wallace and Katherine Kavanaugh, on view at Adkins Arboretum

Adkins Arboretum
RIDGELY, MD
April 6, 2013

Birdsong and spidery tree branches, the scrunch of gravel on a dirt road, and sensations of shadow and light, water and wind unfold in a collection of 50 poems and 50 collage drawings by Jennifer Wallace and Katherine Kavanaugh, on view at Adkins Arboretum Visitor’s Center through May 31. Their collaborative project, One Hundred Footsteps, will take you deep into this world that we inhabit yet hardly notice in the rush and noise of daily life. There will be a reception on Sat., April 20 from 3 to 5 p.m. to meet the artists.

Arranged like loose pages from an unbound book on long shelves lining the walls of the Arboretum gallery, the poems and images are tiny, but their size is deceiving. Every page leads you into a wider world of awareness. Kavanaugh’s collaged fragments of soft fibrous paper, touched with orange, ochre or sooty black, are like bits of remembered landscapes. Wallace’s poems call up distinct sensations of being in a certain place in a particular state of mind.

The two women, both of Baltimore, were friends before they ever thought of collaborating. Both teach at the Maryland Institute College of Art and are very active in their fields. Kavanaugh exhibits her small works, as well as indoor and outdoor installations, in museums, universities and art centers. Wallace has published her poems, essays and photographs in many art and literary publications. Her new book of poems and photographs, It Can Be Solved by Walking, was published in 2012.

One Hundred Footsteps had its beginnings in a visit by Wallace to Kavanaugh’s studio where the artist was working on a series of tiny collages.

“So I saw these small little works,” said Wallace. “And I said, oh, these are just like my poems.”

As they talked, the two realized that they were both creating small scale works—Wallace poems a stanza or two long, Kavanaugh collage drawings not much larger than playing cards—and that both were considering the experience of living in this world with the same gentle, meditative sensibility. They decided to bring their work together as collaboration.

Because the poems and collage drawings aren’t meant to illustrate one another but share what Wallace calls a “similar gesture,” they chose the renga, a medieval Japanese poetic form, as the model for combining their work. Often 100 verses long, rengas are collaborative poems created by a pair or small group of poets, one writing a stanza, the next composing a stanza in response. Like Wallace and Kavanaugh, they focus on experiences of nature, the changing seasons and love.

Each page of One Hundred Footsteps triggers the senses and opens the mind, whether it is one of Wallace’s vivid poems, elegantly printed on a traditional letterpress, or a fragment of an image teasingly disappearing into deep stains of color in one of Kavanaugh’s collage drawings. Seamlessly, their works combine to hone awareness of the richness, beauty and resonance of living in this world. As one of Wallace’s poems says, “…anything seems possible and, guess what: anything is.”

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through May 31 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Registration Underway for Adkins Arboretum’s Summer Nature Camps

Adkins Arboretum’s
RIDGELY, MD
March 25, 2013

Summer belongs to children. For the past eight years, families and children have grown with Adkins Arboretum’s Summer Nature Camps. The camps provide extraordinary ways for children to enjoy summer the old-fashioned way—outdoors.

This year, campers will experience the Arboretum in a variety of ways. Preschoolers ages 2 and 3 (with an adult) can join Camp Bumblebee (June 10–14) to catch tadpoles, pick blueberries and look for butterflies in the meadow. Camp Pollywog (June 17–21) campers ages 4 to 6 will float leaf and twig boats down the Blockston Branch, create leafy magic carpets on the forest floor and experience nature as the world’s best playground.

_ASR4695 Boy & girl exploring a catch emailIn Camp Paw Paw (June 24–28), campers ages 7 to 9 will explore the history of the Chesapeake Bay region through exciting hands-on activities, including target practice with hand-crafted bows and arrows, natural dye-making, and an archaeological dig. Camp Egret (July 8 – 12) campers will use scientific skills to investigate native wildlife, play environmentally themed games, and engage in daily nature art and journaling.

Registration fees vary, and advance registration is required. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

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Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. Through its Campaign to Build a Green Legacy, it will build the W. Flaccus and Ruth B. Stifel Center at Adkins Arboretum and a “green” entranceway to broaden educational offerings and research initiatives promoting best practices in conservation and land stewardship. For additional information about Arboretum programs, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum Offers Soup ’n Walk Program March 23

Adkins Arboretum
March 15, 2013
RIDGELY, MD

Learn about spring’s earliest buds and blooms when Adkins Arboretum offers a popular Soup ’n Walk program on Sat., March 23. Following a guided walk through the Arboretum’s woodland, meadows and wetland, enjoy a delicious and hearty lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided.

Led by an Arboretum docent, the walk will focus on skunk cabbage, spring beauty and bloodroot blooms and the soft buds of paw paw, hickory and tulip tree. The menu includes beet and cabbage soup, black-eyed pea salad, dill rye bread with strawberry jam, and raspberry rhubarb cobbler.

Participants may register for a one-hour walk that begins at 11 a.m. or a two-hour walk that begins at 10 a.m.

The Soup ’n Walk program is $20 per person for members, $25 per person for the general public. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0. To schedule Soup ’n Walk programs for groups of 15 or more, contact Ginna Tiernan, Adult Program Coordinator, at 410-634-2847, ext. 27 or gtiernan@adkinsarboretum.org.

Docent Julianna Pax, at right, points out mountain laurel during a Soup ’n Walk program at Adkins Arboretum. The next Soup ‘’n Walk program is Sat., March 23.

Adkins Arboretum Calendar of Events – April-May 2013

ADKINS ARBORETUM
CALENDAR OF EVENTS, APRIL–MAY 2013

*Advance registration is required for programs. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0.*

APRIL

Nature as Muse
Wednesdays, April 3 and May 1, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Each month this writing group will follow a different winding path through the Arboretum to quietly observe nature in detail. This will provide inspiration for expressing ideas that begin as seeds in our minds and then blossom into discovery as we write. No previous writing experience necessary. Enjoy how the paths in the Arboretum and the paths in your mind can lead you on an unpredictable but delightful journey. Bring a sack lunch and dress for both indoor and outdoor forest adventure. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.

First Saturday Guided Walk
Saturdays, April 6 and May 4, 10 a.m.
Free for members, free with admission for the general public
Explore the rich and unique native plant habitat of Adkins Arboretum. The plant habitats you’ll see include mature and young native forests, meadows, a wetland, as well as a rain garden and a pollinator garden. You may also visit the Arboretum’s Native Plant Nursery and the children’s teaching garden. Tours begin at the Visitor’s Center and last approximately one hour. 410-634-2847, ext. 0 for more information.


ARBOR DAY RUN

Saturday, April 6
Registration 8–8:45 a.m., Start time 9 a.m.
5K Fee: $15; $20 day of event
Family Fun Run/Walk Fee: $10/family
Join fellow runners and nature enthusiasts for the seventh annual Arbor Day Run. The event, which
also features a 5K Run and a one-mile Family Fun Run/Walk, will kick off with a Kids’ 100 Yard Dash at
8:45 a.m. Participants will catch glimpses of spring as they traverse the cross-country course plotted along the Arboretum’s network of scenic forest and meadow paths. Prizes will be awarded and refreshments provided. Register online, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0, or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org.

NATIVE PLANT NURSERY OPENING WEEKEND
Saturday and Sunday, April 13 and 14, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Plan your dream garden! Shop the region’s largest selection of native ornamental perennials, flowering trees and shrubs, vines, ferns, and grasses. Member’s sale day is Friday, April 12. adkinsarboretum.org or 410.634.2847, ext. 0 for more information.

Season’s Bounty
Fridays, April 5, June 7, and September 6
, 10 a.m.–noon
Fee: members: $15 each program or $35 for all three
general public: $20 each program or $45 for all three
Registration required. Limit: 20

Spring Greens—April 5
As the cold of winter makes its reluctant exit and the palette of the landscape goes from dormant-brown to emergent-chartreuse, we often gravitate toward the fresh experience— being outside, renewing the garden, eating green foods. In this first program of a three-part series, Elizabeth Beggins will help you explore avenues for revitalizing yourself and your menu as she discusses growing and preparing such spring delicacies as zesty mustard, nutty arugula, and elegant pac-choy, in addition to favorites such as lettuce and spinach. Tasting samples and starter seed kits are sure to put some spring in your step.

Abundant Summer—June 7
Days lengthen, thermometers rise, and kitchens fill to overflowing with Mother Nature’s gifts. Now is the time to maximize the bounty of summer. Plan on succession plantings at home, and benefit from the burgeoning variety at farmers’ markets. In the second session of this tasty series, Elizabeth will guide you in how to prolong our home harvests and how to savor and store those available from local farmers. Enjoy the flavors of the season as you learn.

Fall Harvest—September 6
Just because we can stop worrying about what to do with yet another summer squash doesn’t mean the food season is over. Late summer is the time to plant a fall garden and the time you’ll find the widest variety of produce all year. Elizabeth will show you how a little preparation now can yield big returns as the weather turns cooler. Greens, garlic, and gorgeous local offerings available at markets and roadside stands are the focus of this final program in the series. As always, savory treats and tools to use at home are an added bonus.

Designing for Waterfront Landscapes

Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m.–noon
Fee: $35 members, $45 general public
Waterfront properties present homeowners with a slew of both daunting challenges and precious opportunities. Join landscape designer and native plant enthusiast Chris Pax, a graduate of the George Washington University sustainable landscape design master’s program, for a look at plants that are good for waterfront landscape conditions and to review some of the special rules and regulations that may apply in your county. You may bring your plat diagram, some photos, and a bag lunch to enjoy with the group afterward—Chris will stay until 1 p.m. to answer questions about your specific property.

Spring Ephemerals—The Fleeting Flowers
Sunday, April 21, 1–2:30 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public
First thing in spring, a dazzling diversity of flowers emerges, but many of us hardly blink before they are gone. Join Arboretum Science Advisor Mary Travaglini on a walk to find these early spring flowers, the harbingers of spring!
Mary holds a bachelor’s of science from Cornell University and a master’s in landscape architecture from the University of Michigan. Active as an outdoor educator, landscape architect, and ecologist, Mary has worked extensively on federal lands and within the private sector as a trail crew leader and landscape designer, and has worked most recently for The Nature Conservancy, the National Park Service, and the Society for Ecological Restoration.

Nature Journaling with Spring Ephemerals
Wednesday, April 24, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Fee: $35 members, $45 general public
Join Lee D’Zmura to focus on the many spring ephemerals in bloom at the Arboretum. Following a brief discussion about these early blooming flowers and techniques to capture their beauty, the class will sketch outdoors and return to compose journal entries. Bring a sack lunch; a list of materials will be provided.

MAY
Bird Migration Walk

Saturday May 4, 8–10 a.m.
Free with admission
Join Wayne Bell on a guided walk to scout for migrants warblers that regularly pass through the Arboretum in early May. Warblers of note include include Black-and-white, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, American Redstart, Yellow-rumped (Myrtle), Magnolia, and (rarer) Blackburnian. Rose-breasted Grosbeak should also be passing through, and resident Indigo Bunting and Blue Grosbeak may be present. Scarlet Tanager, which nests in the mature woods, should also be in good voice. Many of these birds are colorful and full of song.

Dr. Bell is Senior Associate and former Director of the Center for Environment and Society at Washington College. Prior to joining the Washington College faculty in fall 2000, he was Vice President for External Relations for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), a global research facility headquartered at Horn Point near Cambridge, MD. He has served as president of the Arboretum Board of Trustees and is past president of the Maryland Ornithological Society.

Paradise Under Glass
Saturday, May 4, 1–2:30 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public
Like many baby boomers in middle age, Ruth Kassinger was at an emotional crossroads. Confronted with numerous challenges, she was searching for a way forward. One cold, gray evening, flooded with thoughts of change and loss, she wandered into the U.S. Botanic Garden’s conservatory—and a dream was born. Dazzled by the vast and dense tangle of greenery, she began a quest to create a verdant sanctuary of her own at her home in suburban Washington, DC.

Paradise Under Glass chronicles her journey from brown thumb to green. Kassinger takes us step-by-step from the construction of her conservatory through her efforts to identify the easiest to grow, most beautiful houseplants. In chronicling journey to create her own tropical refuge, she also provides a lively narrative tour of the glasshouses of the past, including Renaissance orangeries, the whimsical follies of Georgian England, the legendary Crystal Palace, and secluded Victorian ferneries.

Throughout, she shares the knowledge and insights that creating and sustaining her garden has bestowed, lessons of loss and letting go, nurturing and rebirth, challenge and change, love and serenity. Paradise Under Glass is the remarkable story of the fruition of a dream that is sure to inspire us all.

Twelfth Night: Shakespeare in the Meadow
Saturday, May 4 at 6 p.m.
Sunday, May 5 at 3 p.m.
Fee: $15 adults, $10 students
Mark the date—Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night is coming to the Meadow! Bring a picnic, relax under the stars, and enjoy this classic comedy about love and mistaken identity. Directed by Peter Howell, the performances benefit the Arboretum and Shore Shakespeare.

For more information, visit shoreshakespeare.com. Those who support bringing Shakespeare to the Eastern Shore are invited to make tax-deductible donations to Adkins Arboretum and designated for the benefit of Shore Shakespeare.

Kokedama
Tuesday, May 7, 10 a.m.–noon
Fee: $30 members, $35 general public
Kokedama is the Japanese art form of enclosing a plant’s root mass in moss. Traditionally, Kokedama is displayed on a unique, often handcrafted tray but more recently these ‘moss balls’ are hung from translucent string to appear to float in the air. Join Samantha McCall to create your own Kokedama to bring home and enjoy.

An avid gardener and a dedicated plantswoman, Samantha is a floral designer, a Master Gardener, and a perennial student at Longwood Gardens. A member of several Eastern Shore garden clubs, she also is the owner of Fleurish, an environmentally friendly floral design studio committed to using local plant material whenever possible.

Botanical Shoes
Thursday, May 9, 1–2 p.m.
Fee: $15 members, $20 general public

In 1987, Lenny Wilson learned to make shoes at Cordwainer’s Technical College, a leather trades college in London. Shortly afterward, he began a career in public horticulture and was inspired to create a pair of shoes that incorporated parts of plants into their construction. Using traditional methods and materials, he unifies leather, leaves, and other materials to craft unique life-size shoes.

Join Lenny for a unique presentation as he shares his journey, illustrates what inspires him, demonstrates how he selects plants and employs tools, and relates exhibition and workshop experiences.

A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Lenny holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Delaware. Currently he is the Assistant Director of Horticulture and Facilities at Delaware Center for Horticulture, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in Delaware’s diverse communities through horticulture. His one-of-a-kind shoes made from plant material are displayed in local art galleries and exhibits.

National Public Gardens Day
Friday, May 10, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Celebrate public gardens and their special place in the community! Admission is free—enjoy a walk in the woods, meadows, and gardens.

A Celebration of Natives, Adkins Arboretum’s first native garden tour, will feature seven gardens in Caroline County. The tour not only will highlight the beauty of these gardens but will emphasize the importance of their role in a bio-diverse landscape. Each garden is unique and demonstrates its own flair and commitment in its use of natives.

The Native Garden Tour is Saturday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $15 per person in advance and $25 on the day of the tour. Visit www.adkinsgardentour.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0 to reserve tickets.

Maryland Native Plant Society Movie Night
Tuesday, May 14, 7–8:30 p.m. An early-bird guided walk will be offered at 6:15 p.m.
Free
Maryland Native Plant Society will screen the video Urban & Suburban Meadows: Bringing Meadowscaping to Big and Small Spaces by author and photographer Catherine Zimmerman. The video brings into focus the amazing diversity of life inhabiting meadows, and the beautiful imagery inspires meadow creation. The 60-minute video features meadow experts Michael Nadeau, Larry Weaner and Neil Diboll, who walk the viewer through meadow site preparation, design, planting, and maintenance. Entomologist Doug Tallamy, author of Bringing Nature Home, explains the intricate connection between native plants, native insects, and the soil food web.

The video was created as a companion to the popular book of the same name. It addresses the problems caused by the extensive planting of pesticide-ridden, non-native grass lawns across America. Discussion of the video will follow. Refreshments will be served. Registration is requested.

ART EXHIBITS
One Hundred Footsteps is a unique collaboration between writer Jennifer Wallace and visual artist Katherine Kavanaugh, both of Baltimore. In this limited edition work, fifty of Wallace’s haiku-like poems are paired with fifty small collage drawings by Kavanaugh. Although the poems and images aren’t meant to illustrate one another, they share parallel contemplative moods. On view April 1 through May 31, this meditative exhibit was inspired by a medieval Japanese collaborative poetic form, the renga, often composed of 100 verses. There will be a reception Saturday, April 20 from 3 to 5 p.m.

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Spring Soup ’n Walks
Nature, Nurture, and Nutrition
Saturdays, April 27 and May 18 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Fee: $20 members, $25 general public
Registration required. Limit: 25
Track the changing landscape from winter to spring. Following a guided walk with a docent naturalist, enjoy a delicious and nutritious lunch along with a brief lesson about the meal’s nutritional value. Copies of recipes are provided.

April Theme: Fleeting Ephemerals
Appearing in early spring, ephemerals flower, fruit, and die back in a short period of time. Join a one-hour or two-hour walk to catch glimpses of pink spring beauty, Mayapple, and dogwood blossoms, yellow trout lily, golden groundsel, sassafras and spicebush blooms, and white beech tree blossoms.

Menu
Chicken rice vegetable soup
Cabbage and carrot slaw with nuts
Ancient grain bread with buckwheat honey
Baked pineapple

May Theme: Tuckahoe Creek and Beyond

Tuckahoe Creek is a beautiful, tranquil spot that provides views of a wide variety of flowering plants. Join a one- or two-hour walk to search for mountain laurel, beech and tulip trees, black cherry tree blossoms, pink ladyslipper and Solomon’s seal blooms, and Mayapple fruit.

Menu
Thick and Hearty vegetable chili (vegetarian)
Roasted red beets over mesclun salad
Apple date wheat bread with apple jelly
Blueberry marmalade crisp
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Spring Preschool Programs
Celebrate spring at the Arboretum with your preschooler! Discover the wonders of bluebirds, spring blooms, pollywogs, and more in a six-week program brimming with hands-on fun. Classes are open to children ages 3 to 5. Advance registration is required. Enrollment is limited to 15 children, so early registration is recommended. Each class includes a healthy snack and a craft. Programs will be offered Tuesdays, April 9–May 14.

The Science of Spring for Homeschoolers
Each spring, the Arboretum’s wetland teems with new life. Home school students will welcome the spring season with hands-on exploration of plant and animal life cycles. Activities will include using microscopes to study wetland organisms, dissecting flowering plants, investigating metamorphosis in a stream study, and more. Students should be prepared to make new friends, get a little dirty, and have fun with science! This program is designed for students in grades 2–5. This program will be offered Mondays, April 8–May 11.

Adkins Arboretum Offers Science Program for Home School Students

Adkins Arboretum
March 1, 2013
RIDGELY, MD

This spring, homeschoolers will welcome the spring season with hands-on exploration of plant and animal life cycles when Adkins Arboretum offers The Science of Spring for Home School Students. Students in grades 2 through 5 will use microscopes to study organisms at the cellular level, dissect flowering plants, investigate metamorphosis in a stream study, and much more.

This six-week program runs Mondays, April 8 to May 13, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The fee is $55 for members, $70 for the general public, with a $10 discount for siblings. Advance registration is required at adkinsarboretum.org or by calling 410-634-2847, ext. 0.